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ANATOMY OF A LEVEL

VIALS:
There are many types of vials with most being yellow. Yellow vials are for general around the home use. Blue vials are for people needing superior accuracy, visibility and durability. See anatomy of a vial for more information.

WORK SURFACES:
Levels have a number of work surfaces. The primary work surface is on the thinner sides. These sides can be made of a variety of materials, often depending on the material of the frame. The very best levels have milled edges to maximize the flatness of the work surface.

Also, very good levels can be used on their sides as well. To learn more, see the 10 working positions of a level.

HAND GRIPS:
There are as many hand grip types as there are levels. For occasional use, grips don't matter that much. But for pro's that use their levels often, a good grip can make the difference between sore, tired hands and comfort. Look for dual density grips or very smooth extruded hand grips for the best fit.

PROTECTIVE END CAPS:
Levels are precision instruments that need to be handled with care. But we all know accidents happen. That's why each of our levels has protective caps. These caps absorb impact and protect the vial from damaging shock. The best professional levels have accordion style ''shocks'' which provide maximum protection.

LEVEL FRAME:
Levels are generally made of plastic, aluminum or wood. Plastic levels are inexpensive and adequate for simple, around the house jobs. Entry level consumer grade aluminum levels are also very affordable, but provide longer life and better accuracy. If your customer can afford it, this is a much better choice, even for simple projects. Professional levels are made of wood or aluminum and are much more ridged and durable. The superior materials used in these products will assure longer life and greater accuracy. The best levels are easy to notice… they have blue vials.

  • SOUL OF A BUILDER SINCE 1919
    • 1919
    • 1922
      1922
      Adjustable level
      invented by Empire
    • 1935
      1935
      First torpedo level
    • 1956
      1956
      Empire introduces
      Extruded Aluminum levels
    • 1965
      1965
      Empire invents the
      Magnetic level
    • 1967
      1967
      Mono Vial
      revolutionizes
      the industry
    • 1978
      1978
      Empire develops
      Polycast® levels
    • 1994
      1994
      Titan Box level
      is introduced
    • 2004
      2004
      Empire introduces
      True Blue®
    • 2005
      2005
      e70 is
      introduced
    • 2006
      2006
      em71 is
      introduced
    • 2007
      2007
      e50 is
      introduced
    • 2009
      2009
      True Blue® e100
      is introduced
    • 2013
      2013
      True Blue® Second Generation e2G Introduced